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Author Topic: Glass Weaving  (Read 3712 times)
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nansea121
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« on: February 09, 2010, 03:39:10 PM »
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Here is a glass weave I made with an Interweave mold. I found some nice instructions at this website:

http://www.weavezine.com/content/how-weave-glass

That website shows how she makes her own weave mold.
You can buy clay bars already made up, a clay mold, such as the one I used, or a stainless steel one.

The first set of strips are called the 'warp' of the weave.
For the mold I’m using, I cut out the 10 strips to fit from outside edge to outside edge - 8¼” x ½”.



Warp strips in the kiln ready for the first firing.


This next photo shows that the glass didn’t slump down far enough. It’s important to get the strips to slump down far enough so the ‘weft’ (straight strips) can slide through the warp strips easily.



That website suggested 1200°F with a hold of 20 minutes. This photo shows that the strips didn’t slump down enough so I redid it at 1300°F with a hold of 30 minutes.  



The next 2 pics shows the weft or straight glass strips being slide into place. After you remove them from the mold and wash off the kiln wash powder, I flipped each strip so that one was facing up and the other down - making the ‘hills and valley’s' line up alternately for the weft ‘thread can slide in. I found that  ½” was slightly too large for some of them to slide inside, so I made each weft strip 1/16“ narrower.






The second firing was to tack all the strips together which I did at a slow tack of 1350°F for 15 minutes.

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nansea121
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« Reply #1 on: February 09, 2010, 03:40:35 PM »
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The dark green and yellow strips are straight strips of glass that were woven into the wavy molded glass.



The third and final firing of a slow slump. For my kiln I did that at 1225°F for 15 minutes.


Many thanks Becki for helping me figure out some of those firing schedules:) Small flowers


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Kev
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« Reply #2 on: February 09, 2010, 03:44:46 PM »
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Nice Job Nancy!
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nansea121
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« Reply #3 on: February 09, 2010, 03:48:47 PM »
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Nice Job Nancy!

I've seen the 'weaves' where the glass is placed on top of each other. I was really itching to try this method out.
Have you tried out a weave mold yet Kev? I like how the glass actually gets woven into each other.

I have another going in the kiln:)
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Kev
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« Reply #4 on: February 09, 2010, 03:58:08 PM »
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No I have not tried that method yet.
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Glassic
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« Reply #5 on: February 09, 2010, 03:59:45 PM »
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Lovely! So much easier than binary!
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Becki
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« Reply #6 on: February 09, 2010, 04:42:48 PM »
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Glad the schedule tips worked for you, Nancy.  Nice job!  I enjoy doing weaves!
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nansea121
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« Reply #7 on: February 09, 2010, 04:52:16 PM »
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Thanks Becki, Yvonne & Kev:) Now there's an interesting way to make plaids! Giggle

The one I have in the kiln now has some stringers and noodles added for a bit more texture.
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PiscesGlass
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« Reply #8 on: February 09, 2010, 05:25:43 PM »
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Cool Nancy!  It turned out well!  And you did just an awesome job with your tutorial!  I hope you're keeping all of these teaching posts for a book you should put together some day!!

De
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Barbara
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« Reply #9 on: February 09, 2010, 05:56:10 PM »
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They thoroughly came out great. I think the People that think these up are very innovative to say the least.  Really nice.
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nansea121
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« Reply #10 on: February 09, 2010, 06:38:40 PM »
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Thank ye kindly De and Barb:)

I'm hooked to the kiln right now for sure. Just wish I knew what I was doing! lol.

That light at the end of the tunnel is still verrrry small, like I'm driving an automatic verses a standard with the kiln.  I think when I can finally make a firing schedule from scratch, I'll feel like I'm making a little more headway in the land of fuse.

It sure is fun to 'speriment!
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Linde
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« Reply #11 on: February 09, 2010, 06:47:31 PM »
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Nancy, you seem to be doing a very nice job on you 'speriments'. I was thinking that this is another way for you to do your plaids. Nice job.
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Anne
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« Reply #12 on: February 09, 2010, 07:42:06 PM »
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Really nice Nancy, and it's great that you gave us the tutorial.  I have that mold, just another thing I haven't gotten to!  Hum....
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ct4mom
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« Reply #13 on: February 09, 2010, 07:59:42 PM »
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They are so cool Nancy, love the pics....another gotta try added to the growing list
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nansea121
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« Reply #14 on: February 10, 2010, 09:42:38 AM »
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Thanks Linde, Anne and Di:)

Here is another one I got out of the kiln last night. I slide in some stringers and noodles to add a little more detail.







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nansea121
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« Reply #15 on: February 10, 2010, 02:28:20 PM »
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In that on-line tutorial, she used a clear base, but I kinda like the holes. I think I'd like to try a closer weave for the next one.  Another idea could be to use only stringer and noodles for a very fine weave. grin
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Kev
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« Reply #16 on: February 10, 2010, 03:04:54 PM »
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Looking cool Nancy.
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Anne
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« Reply #17 on: February 10, 2010, 03:34:20 PM »
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In that on-line tutorial, she used a clear base, but I kinda like the holes. I think I'd like to try a closer weave for the next one.  Another idea could be to use only stringer and noodles for a very fine weave. grin

The noodles and especially the stringer would be delicate to use.  In my clumsy hands almost impossible, but try it Nancy, would like to see how it works out.
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Becki
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« Reply #18 on: February 10, 2010, 03:46:12 PM »
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The noodles and stringers would be very fragile.  That might be one that you would want to put on a clear base.
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Rebecca
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« Reply #19 on: February 10, 2010, 04:12:51 PM »
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There is a lady who makes weaves with stringer.  She doesn't actually "weave" them.  She arranges the stringers in layers.  She uses an ENORMOUS number of stringers.  They look cool when she is finished.  I will try to find her instructions if anyone is interested.  The instructions tell how many stringers to use.  Of course, you don't really need instructions, just keep layering them this way and that until you think it's thick enough.

Rebecca 
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Kev
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« Reply #20 on: February 10, 2010, 04:16:50 PM »
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I've seem pieces done in that way as well and it looks like fabric..quite cool.
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Audrey
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Gail Audrey Wynne
« Reply #21 on: February 10, 2010, 04:18:21 PM »
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Great job. They are lovely and the explanations are fascinating.
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nansea121
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« Reply #22 on: February 10, 2010, 05:27:19 PM »
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I saw some on-line examples of some really wonderful weaves. Some look very much like cloth, Kev!
Becki, I saw some that some have a bottom glass while others don't. Some look pretty densely packed. I'd be interested in seeing those instructions Rebecca!

Have a look at these beauties!!!

This link takes you to their inividual weaves. Just click on an image and it will open up in another window.
http://www.wovenglass.com/sec_portfolio.htm
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nansea121
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« Reply #23 on: February 10, 2010, 05:41:58 PM »
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The noodles and stringers would be very fragile.  That might be one that you would want to put on a clear base.

I'm wondering if Eric Marklow & Thom Norris (the creators in that website) have solid glass bottoms on all their pieces? I love how they make some of the edges look like a piece of cloth that looks like it's gotten unraveled a bit.
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Kev
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« Reply #24 on: February 10, 2010, 05:48:21 PM »
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Just my personal opinion, but, I must say...that stuff does not impress me at all. I appreciate the skill required, but for the most part I think the product is quite unattractive ..looks like an old rag rugs. Guess I'm not artistically gifted enough to see the beauty in it....LOL
« Last Edit: February 10, 2010, 06:05:42 PM by Kev » Logged
nansea121
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« Reply #25 on: February 10, 2010, 06:03:11 PM »
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I find them very unusual indeed. It's the ideas that trigger other ideas. Even the not so attractive can spur the creative imagination to places unknown. To me, they look like woven cloth with a twist:)
« Last Edit: February 10, 2010, 06:06:13 PM by nansea121 » Logged
Becki
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« Reply #26 on: February 10, 2010, 09:34:42 PM »
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There are quite a few that do wonderful stringer work.  It can be time consuming but well worth the effort.  Here are some nice examples.  http://earth2glass.weebly.com/glass-stringer-artwork.html
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ct4mom
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« Reply #27 on: February 10, 2010, 10:49:53 PM »
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Wow I can see why they dont ship them they look soo delicate
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Theresa
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« Reply #28 on: February 10, 2010, 10:54:10 PM »
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I tried one using noodles. Front and back. Very fragile.

Sorta reminded me of the woven pot holders I made back in the day.  grin
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Kev
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« Reply #29 on: February 11, 2010, 07:19:01 AM »
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Delicate for sure.
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